5 Rules of Composition to Make Any Image More Interesting

Have you ever taken a picture of something and been so unimpressed with the outcome? I hear ya.
 .
I’ve done the same thing many times so I thought it would be helpful to share five composition “rules” you can use the next time you’re shooting to create a stronger and more interesting image.
  .
However, these rules were meant to be broken (if you want). The final image you create will depend on your personal style and what you’re trying to convey in the image.
  .
So why is composition important? Because it guides the viewer’s eye to the most important parts of the picture. Good composition can enhance something that’s really boring, and bad composition can detract from something that’s otherwise interesting.
 . 
Here are some good starting points to use whether you’re shooting for your blog or just wanting to improve your photography.
  .

Rule of Thirds

  .
This is a common composition rule to remember. Imagine the image has two vertical and two horizontal lines breaking the image into 9 squares. In this rule, you try to put the subject at one of the four intersecting points or on one of the vertical lines like Lauren is in this image. This helps create more interest and balance.
  .
I like how this image plays with multiple sets of lines and I think it’s more balanced having her on the side as opposed to the very center.
 .

Megan_Weaver_27aPINME

Patterns

  .
Patterns are extremely pleasing to the eye (remember this for Instagram!). You can look for patterns that appear in nature or ones that are man-made. Patterns suggest rhythm or harmony, which is pleasing to the eye. You can also break up the pattern to create more interest in an image by placing someone or something in the middle of the pattern (or to the side) so the eye has somewhere to go.
  .
I love how the bright pink shoes break up the pattern and strong horizontal lines. ​
 .

PatternsPINME

 .

Framing

  .
Frames can help create more interest in an image as well, and again, they can be natural or man-made. The wall and railings make a lose frame for Katey to stand in, but you could also use frames like arches, doorways, tree branches, tunnels, or windows. Framing helps to lead the viewer’s eye to your subject. It can also show more depth since the frame is usually closer to the camera. When shooting, ask yourself if the frame will add to or take away from the subject and image as a whole.
 .

Framing_instaPINME

 .

Perspective

  .
It’s easy to shoot at one level or perspective for an entire shoot. To change it up, try shooting at different angles — shooting someone from above will make them appear smaller, while shooting them closer to the ground will make them appear larger. You can also experiment with close cropping or shooting from a distance to give another perspective.
  .
For this shot, I wanted it to be all about the movement of the skirt, so I focused on that and cropped the top of the image in camera.
 .

PerspectivePINME

 .

Leading Lines

  .
This is another fun rule to start noticing while you’re shooting (and even when you’re not). The human eye is naturally drawn in to a photo along the lines — the lines can be straight, curvy, diagonal, etc. Use the lines to guide your viewer’s eye where you want it to go. You can also use diagonal lines to help create drama in your image by adding depth.
  .
I like how the bridge creates more depth in this image — and it allows more bokeh to be in the image too (which is my fave).
 

Leading LinesPINME

 .
What would you add to this list? Have any favorite composition rules you like to use? Comment below and I’d love to hear it!
  
  .
 

Get my free Photography for Fashion Bloggers Starter Kit

Starter_kit_opt-in_box_blue

Get my 7-step checklist for taking your own outfit photos, learn which mistakes to avoid when shooting and find out which tools you'll need to create gorgeous blog photos like a pro!

We won't send you spam. Unsubscribe at any time. Powered by ConvertKit
share on pin to tweet on email to

Your email is never published or shared. Required fields are marked *

*

*